Daylight Saving Time Disrupts Our Sleep

Daylight Saving Time disrupts our sleep. Twice a year, every year. Sleep Disruption! Arizona and Hawaii get it right! The data shows that the switch back and forth to and from Summertime affects us all, night owls as much as morning larks. Both are affected in the same way, on average about three weeks of sleep pattern disruption per year.

REM Sleep by City: Size Matters!

The data shows that there is a correlation between city size and REM sleep. Las Vegas is an outlier, but we can all expect that: Who is in Las Vegas to sleep! REM sleep is important to our sleep cycle because it stimulates the areas of your brain that are essential in learning and making or retaining memories. The importance of REM sleep, in particular, is attributed to the fact that during this phase of sleep, our brain exercises important neural connections which are key to mental and overall well-being and health. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, <https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Understanding-Sleep> a study depriving rats of REM sleep significantly shortened their life span, from two or three years to five weeks. Rats deprived of all sleep cycles lived only five weeks.

Weekday Sleep Deficit by Age and Gender

We all live in a sleep-deprived society, regardless of age. In the graphic below, we studied sleep deficits from Fullpower’s PSG-level Sleeptracker AI platform. Of course, we should all sleep longer, but the reality of modern life is that we only have so much of a “sleep budget” given the constraints of family, work, social media, etc. Therefore, a complementary focus is on the quality of sleep: Improving sleep quality for better sleep is important. For that purpose, bedding, mattress quality, respiratory environment, and temperature control are very important as some of us sleep hot (mostly males) and some of us want to be warmer. All of the above are potentially big contributors to sleep quality, or what we know as restful sleep.

Of note here, women typically average less of a sleep deficit than males.

This plot assumes a target sleep time of 8.5 hours for those under 22 and 8 hours for those above 22. In line with recommendations from the National Sleep Foundation:  //www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need. It’s “conservative” for those under 22 meaning you could increase it and show even more of a deficit for that age group (just shifts the y-axis labels).

Tempur Sealy and Fullpower Form Strategic Partnership to Deliver Smarter Sleep Experiences Through AI-Powered Technology

LEXINGTON, KY, and SANTA CRUZ, CA, August 14, 2019 – Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (NYSE: TPX), the company synonymous with innovation in the mattress industry, and Fullpower Technologies, Inc., the sleep technology company, today announced a strategic partnership.

“When selecting a technology partner we evaluated all existing options and Fullpower has a clearly superior platform,” said Scott Thompson, Tempur Sealy President and CEO. “We also share a common vision to radically improve customers’ sleep experiences through continued innovation.”

“Tempur Sealy is the best bedding company on the planet,” said Philippe Kahn, Fullpower Technologies Chairman. “Together, we aim to improve lives through better, smarter sleep.”

Through this partnership, Tempur-Pedic recently unveiled the Tempur-Ergo® Smart Base Collection powered by Sleeptracker® AI. The Sleeptracker® AI Platform is designed and operated by Santa Cruz-based Fullpower. Combined with adaptable Tempur-Pedic mattresses, the Tempur-Ergo® Smart Base powered by Sleeptracker® AI creates a completely integrated system with personalized sleep analytics and coaching, plus a uniquely-responsive foundation that can now automatically respond to snoring and may help people sleep more comfortably.*

About Tempur Sealy International, Inc. 
Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (NYSE: TPX) develops, manufactures, and markets mattresses, foundations, pillows and other products. The Company’s products are sold worldwide through third party retailers, its own stores, and online. The Company’s brand portfolio includes many highly recognized brands in the industry, including Tempur®, Tempur-Pedic®, Sealy® featuring Posturepedic® Technology, and Stearns & Foster®. World headquarters for Tempur Sealy International is in Lexington, KY. For more information, visit http://www.tempursealy.com or call 800-805-3635.

About Fullpower Technologies Inc. 
Fullpower Technologies designs, develops and operates a complete platform for hybrid Edge/Cloud AI, algorithms, big data, predictive analytics, together with end-to-end engineering services. The Company’s platform is backed by a patent portfolio of 125+ patents. The Company’s key areas of expertise are non-invasive PSG-level sleep technology as well as general activity quantification. The Company’s markets are in Medical, SmartHome and Wearable Solutions. For more information, visit http://www.fullpower.com.

*May reduce snoring in otherwise healthy individuals who snore due to body positioning. 

Tempur-Pedic and Tempur-Ergo are registered trademarks of Tempur Sealy International, Inc.

Fullpower and Sleeptracker are trademarks of Fullpower Technologies, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. 

Tempur Sealy International, Inc.

Erin Maratea
Public Relations
859-455-2988
publicrelations@tempursealy.com

Aubrey Moore
Investor Relations
Tempur Sealy International, Inc.
800-805-3635
Investor.relations@tempursealy.com

Fullpower Technologies, Inc.

Tom Lewin
Public Relations
media@fullpower.com

How the Monroe Earthquake Impacted Sleep Patterns in the Seattle Area

At Fullpower, we were thinking about last week’s Seattle earthquake and doing some geographical distribution analysis. That earthquake hit right in the middle of our night. So many of those Sleeptracker users around Seattle got affected. Here is a graphical representation using the Sleeptracker AI-powered predictive analytics of how that sleep disruption developed.

Fullpower.com – The Sleep Technology Company

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Seasonality of sleep by latitude in the continental US

Yes, less sunlight means more sleep!

At Fullpower, we looked at the data. The Fullpower dataset includes 250 million nights of sleep. Sleep information from the Sleeeptracker Monitor is unique because it is fully contactless and non-invasive, yet still accurate to within 90%+ gold standard polysomnography. Data shows that continuous heart rate averaged throughout the night is minimized with 7.5 hours of sleep. From there, we find that on average, the answer to our question is 10.8% of deep sleep and 25.3% of REM sleep.

Fullpower.com – The Sleep Technology Company

Seasonal Correlation of Breathing Rate and Heart Rate Through the Night

This week at Fullpower, we continue to drill down our accurate multi-year data set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We now discovered previously un-identified seasonal patterns correlating continuous Breathe and heart rate over a couple of years. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous breath and heart rate throughout the night.

Seasonal changes occur with higher breath rates in the summer and lower in the winter. This is similar to what was observed in this independent study in Japan

Our AI-powered analytics discovered this new correlation, and found the “inverse” breath correlations which seem to be published in this post for the first time ever as we couldn’t find this science published anywhere! Fascinating power of our long term PSG-grade datasets and tools!

Seasonality and daily analysis of continuous heart rate through the night

This week at Fullpower, we continue to drill down our accurate multi-year data set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We found some new interesting weekly patterns within the previously identified seasonal patterns. This infographic shows weekly zoomed-in in heart rate. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous heart rate throughout the night.

Seasonal changes occur with lower heart rates in the summer and higher in the winter. This same pattern was also observed in this independent study in Japan. Our AI-powered analytics discovered this independently, and then we found the very interesting Japan paper https://lnkd.in/gNpi7ub .

Notice week after week, there is a consistent weekly cycle with lower heart rates early in the week leading to higher heart rates on the weekends and then recovery. Interesting.

Seasonal Correlation of Heart Rate Through the Night

At Fullpower, we analyzed our accurate multi-year data-set that comprises 250+ million nights of sleep. We found some interesting seasonal patterns. This infographic shows seasonal changes in heart rate. The Fullpower Sleeptracker platform captures continuous heart rate throughout the night completely non-invasively. Each individual fluctuation in the graph is a weekly max and min, the max being in general weekends (bedtime and wake-time discipline are more lax on weekends) and weekdays with a more disciplined schedule and less “distractions”.

This is what we can observe:

  • Seasonal changes occur with lower heart rates in the summer and higher in the winter.  This same pattern was also observed in this independent study in Japan. Our AI-powered analytics discovered this independently and then we found the very interesting Japan paper.
  • There’s a consistent weekly cycle throughout the year with lower heart rates during the week and higher on the weekends (affected by time to bed, diet, and alcohol).
  • We see a big spike for New Year’s eve (time to bed, diet and alcohol).
  • There’s a significant dip after New Year’s, perhaps due to New Year’s resolutions (better diet, decreased alcohol, more disciplined sleep schedule), but eventually, it fizzles.
  • We see another spike after the Super Bowl.

Long Before Selfies and Memes, People Wanted to Share Pics

There was a time not so long ago when people snapped photos and didn’t think about sharing them until much later. But these days, you might consider whether to share a pic before you’ve even taken it. Camera phones have made image transmission almost instantaneous, and it’s radically changed the way people take photographs—and perhaps even the way they live their lives.

“You are much more focused on the question of ‘OK, what do I share?'” says Clément Chéroux, curator of the new exhibit Snap+Share at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. “It’s not about what I’m going to take a photo of to keep as a souvenir. It’s really about what I’m going to share.”

The impulse to share images isn’t new, though. In the late 19th century, postcards detailing the sender’s location and status crisscrossed postal service routes. As photography became accessible, people subjected friends and family to slideshows; later, they hooked their digital cameras up to PCs and created new albums on Facebook. Still, the speed and scale at which we now express this impulse is unprecedented: 3.2 billion pics every day, each uploaded in a moment, many for a public audience. “It’s not only to one recipient,” Chéroux notes. “It’s to thousands.”

You can trace it all back to a photo of someone’s baby. In 1997, software developer Philippe Kahn became the first person to share a cell phone pic when he soldered cables between his Casio digital camera, Toshiba laptop, and Motorola phone to send his newborn daughter’s face to more than 2,000 people. Within three years, camera phones by Sharp, Samsung, and Sanyo were appearing on store shelves—culminating in the iPhone in 2007 and its game-changing apps the next year. Today the audience is never more than a share button away, and life all too easily devolves into a photographic performance fueled by hearts, likes, and comments.

Snap+Share is an ambitious attempt to grapple with these changes. Among the artists included in the show, Erik Kessels tries to visualize the photo glut in his work 24 HRS in Photos, which is exactly what it sounds like—staggering heaps of pictures representing a single day of all the world’s shares. David Horvitz highlights just how quickly even the most pointless of images spread in 241543903. It features memes—made in response to a call Horvitz put out through his Tumblr—of people sticking their heads into freezers, tagged with a number he made up by combining the serial number on his fridge and UPC numbers on some freezer food.

But it’s the taxidermy cat poking out of a hole in the museum’s ceiling—Eva and Franco Mattes’ Ceiling Cat—that looms the biggest. It’s based on a viral meme of a similar cat accompanied by the warning, “Ceiling Cat is watching you.” Chéroux says it’s a metaphor for surveillance: “If the cat is watching us, the internet is watching us.”

Just something to think about as you share your next pic.

Snap+Share runs March 30 through August 4 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Read the original version of this article at Wired.com

https://www.wired.com/story/photography-sharing-gallery/